Indoor Aeroponic Tomatoes/Peppers

Just noticed my first little baby tomato flowers- they are so tiny I almost missed em! I am estimating my plants are no older than ~30 days. I know tomatoes develop a little quicker than peppers in general, but I seem to remember picking up some info along the lines of pruning the first flowers that arise in order to create a better harvest? Can somebody either verify that info or tell me what I am supposed to do next?

I also thought of another little dilema... The 2 roma tomatoes have a couple tiny flowers each, nothing on the beefsteak yet, and the peppers are no where near flowering I don't think. So my dilema... the plants are under 6500K light right now... I do have a 2700K light but should I wait until the peppers are flowering to add the 2700K light? (I am assuming the peppers still need the 6500K for vegetative growth more than the tomatoes need the 2700K right now?) Help... I am new to this : )

The first 2 pictures were taken 6 days before the following pictures... Can you believe the growth rate????? I am convinced I can see them grow! : P

Also, another question- the picture of the leaf with brownish dry spots... what's the problem there? It occured after a bump in the amount of nutes used in the reservoir so my best conclusion is nutrient toxicity? It's only happening on the tomato's leaves (both beefsteak and roma, but not the peppers) and only on the lower leaves. I did add one more gallon to the reservoir to dilute the nutes until I know what it is. Any help and knowledge shared is greatly appreciated!

ONE more thing (I am so forgetful!) I don't understand why my jalapeno's leaves are curling down so much like that (see pic)? The bell pepper's aren't doing that, and the jalapeno looks really healthy other than that. Should I be worried?

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Ginger
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Hi, GTG, How're your plants

Hi, GTG,

How're your plants coming along?

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Beth11
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Hi GTG,   Nice set up!  I'm

Hi GTG,

  Nice set up!  I'm still at the aerogarden level - Peat and Gisette are the real veterans.  It looks like they got you all set up with EC and pH.  I'm getting ready for fall/winter growing.  I'm determined to grow tomatoes in the ag that actually produce ripe fruit.  I had fantastic luck with Jalapenos.  They continued to fruit until I got tired of them in the spring.  No luck with cucumbers in the ag; good luck with cucs in soil (earthbox) under fluorescent lights in the basement last year.  Killer swiss chard as well.  We had an awful summer here in southern Maryland with 65 days of humid temps in the 90's.  The humidity is a killer (literally - encourages lots of fungal disease) so I'm ready for my indoor grow.

Beth

 

 

 

 

Ginger
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GTG makes sense. Baking soda

GTG makes sense.

Baking soda = sodium bicarbonate. Probably not a good idea. Probably also no more or less organic than the chemicals in pH-Up. Whether they qualify as "organic" by US standards or not, I don't know.

Browsing over to a hydroponics shop, I see the standard pH Up is made of potassium carbonate and potassium hydroxide. Makes sense. Plants need potassium. Sowing fields with salt was already a known no-no millenia ago. The liquid stuff I use goes with the General Hydroponics nutes we both use.

I'd really recommend buying that pH control kit.

Or, hunt around and see if there is a more "organic" product available - for pH control. I've never seen one, though I wasn't looking. I suspect even people using more "organic" nutrients, still use the same General Hydroponics pH control kit.

But in the meantime (assuming you can't get that kit very quickly - though in Phoenix, maybe you can), you need to do something about the pH in your nutes. So... About all you can do is dump the reservoir and make new nutes. Which you should do anyway, if you haven't changed out your water yet. But also - test the fresh batch of nutes. It maybe be the pH is too low in the first place.

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GreenThumbGirl (not verified)
I am perfectly fine with GTG

I am perfectly fine with GTG or Alyssa :) Whichever rolls off the typing fingers easier haha :)

GISETTE is the WINNER!!! You were 100% right... my pH is at 5.5... EEK. I have a little digital meter and tested the water. Now... onto the solution. I like to stay as organic or natural as possible... baking soda for pH up? How much? I have about 6 gallons of nutes solution in the tank for baseline estimate. Thanks!

 

P.S. I was happy to hear no pruning! I would be devestated if it was recommended- it's my first one! : P

Ginger
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Gorgeous plants,

Gorgeous plants, GreenThumbGirl! (Do you have a preference on how to shorten that, or prefer the whole thing each time? ) Very happy, with that grow rate. In the next few weeks the tomatoes should really overshoot the peppers.

Answers are just my opinion...

I wouldn't prune off any flowers. You're not trying for supersizing the plants. On romas, especially, it would simply subtract from your yield. The peppers will most likely drop first flowers and fruits no matter what you do. Let them.

Tomatoes are OK with the current light. Wait until the peppers start to flower before changing lights.

The brown spots look like pH drifting too acidic. I have that problem all the time with solanaceae (however you spell it - the tomato / eggplant / pepper family, but mostly tomatoes and eggplants) in hydroponic nutes. They drink the water fast, and leave a low-pH unbalanced too-concentrated nute bath behind. You really need to replace all of it, preferably every week, and watch its pH, with that much plant in that small a tub.

Adding more water would have helped - but kinda masks the problem. It could also be the nutes are mixed too strong. Generally speaking, it's always better to err on the side of too-weak nutes, since too-strong is toxic. Unfortunately, peppers like it much stronger than tomatoes do. If you're going to move them to separate tubs - now would be the time! It's going to be hard for the peppers to get enough light as the tomatoes swallow them. They're very wide plants.

I'm not worried about the limp-leaf pepper. Watch the attitude of the tomato and pepper branches change over the course of the day. Ultra slow motion jumping jacks. But generally, pepper leaves do hang down. Though they too are affected (less sensitive than the tomatoes) by too much nutes or too low pH.

Like I said, just my opinion, heavily influenced by stuff Peat and Beth and others have told me over the years.

Moderator. Author of Indoor SaladEcigs 102, and the Calm Act climate apocalyptic series.